Common Pitfalls of IoT Projects: Reason Four

Common Pitfalls of IoT Projects: Reason Four

There is No Internal IoT Expertise

While IoT seems fairly straight-forward to business leaders, for many IT departments, IoT projects require a set of skills that might not exist in-house. For example, do we expect IT to figure out how to put sensors and radios into products? In some instances, the products in question are made by other companies and IT has no control over the internal mechanisms.

Common Pitfalls of IoT Projects: Reason Three

Common Pitfalls of IoT Projects: Reason Three

IoT Integrations are Underestimated

IoT adds a lot of fuel to the fire. Not properly managed, it can send businesses into overload, and frankly, this kills a lot of IoT projects. From manufacturing to new SKUs, to new business models and streams of revenue, to new distribution requirements, to new installation protocols (and possibly new installation skills), to billing systems, to new customer support skills, IoT has a large and significant organizational impact. And this doesn’t even contemplate what marketing and sales need in order to get the message out, sell the solution, and train new users.

Common Pitfalls of IoT Projects: Reason One

Common Pitfalls of IoT Projects: Reason One

The Clock is Ticking

There is no doubt that firmware and underestimating the complexity of devices themselves are game changers in the IoT timeline equation. The impact on the project timeline is significant. From the time a firmware issue is identified, a fix is developed, and a technician is sent onsite, it could be anywhere from four to six weeks.

Charting Your IoT Course

Charting Your IoT Course

How Are You Tackling IoT? Jumping In Head First Or Taking A Wait And See Approach?

Many business leaders have a dilemma today when it comes to IoT. They know that IoT bridges the gap between their customers and the products and services they sell. They know that IoT puts them in a position to collect and leverage an unprecedented amount of data that can open up new streams of revenue or cost savings. And they know that implementing IoT is not like anything they have ever done before. Despite knowing all this, many business leaders don’t know where or how to start IoT. Do you just jump in head first and figure it out as you go? Or do you spend the next 6 months making a detailed plan to try and mitigate your risk? Perhaps it’s a little of both.